(L-R) Trevor Brown, Assistant Head of Birmingham YOS, Cllr Jess Phillips, Birmingham Victims Champion, Leonie Folan, ASB Project Worker Safer Travel, Cllr Judith Rowley, Tony Dallison, National Express Head of Service Delivery
(L-R) Trevor Brown, Assistant Head of Birmingham YOS, Cllr Jess Phillips, Birmingham Victims Champion, Leonie Folan, ASB Project Worker Safer Travel, Cllr Judith Rowley, Tony Dallison, National Express Head of Service Delivery

A £22,000 restorative justice project has been launched in Birmingham to tackle anti-social behaviour on the public transport network. The scheme will target young people aged 10 to 18 who have been involved in incidents of nuisance or anti- social behaviour. The young people will come face to face with the victims of their actions and also be made to repair any damage such as cleaning graffiti off a bus.

This project originated through a partnership between the Birmingham Youth Offending Service (YOS) and the Safer Travel Partnership’s recently formed Anti-Social Behaviour team. Restorative justice interventions have been known to reduce reoffending by as much as 27% and therefore can be a very effective way of deterring repeat behaviour. It is also cost effective – for every £1 spent on restorative justice the criminal justice system is estimated to save £9.

The initial pilot for the project will work with 32 offenders over a 24 week period and if successful, will be developed in other parts of the West Midlands.